NHARL Takes on a New Puppy Store

Over Memorial Day Weekend, NHARL was out in force protesting a new puppy store that opened in Manchester. 

A description of the store is included in a letter to the Union Leader written by one of our board members.  

Along with holding signs, we were able to have some conversations with curious onlookers about the problem with pet store puppies.

We also handed out the 2-sided flyer shown below (click for printable PDF).

Successful Outreach at NH Fish & Game Event

New Hampshire Animal Rights League is delighted to share the news of our successful outreach efforts at NH Fish & Game’s Discover Wild NH Day held April 15, 2023 in Concord.

During this popular family event that attracts thousands, we educated people about the harm to wildlife and the environment caused by lead ammunition.

In the photo above, Caelin explains to a young visitor that a piece of lead only the size of a grain of rice is enough to kill an eagle.

Our tent attracted non-stop visitors, with kids waiting in line to spin our “Am I Safe from Lead?” wheel.

Accomplishments

  • Educated hundreds of people, young and old, about the harm lead ammunition causes to wildlife and the environment.
  • Sounded the alarm about the dangers lead poses to bald and golden eagles, foxes, bobcats, and other animals, who can become sick and die from consuming contaminated prey and carcasses.
  • Connected with fellow exhibitor The Loon Preservation Committee in our shared desire to protect wildlife from lead poisoning. The Loon Preservation Committee was behind the New Hampshire law banning the sale and freshwater use of lead fishing tackle to protect loons.
  • Spoke to Scott Mason, Director the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department about the dangers of lead ammo, when he stopped by our tent at the start of the event.

Literature

We handed out a brochure we created for the event, Get the lead out of hunting.

PosterS

We displayed the following posters to discuss with visitors to our booth.

Letter Signing Campaign

We invited children and adults to sign our letter asking NH Fish and Game to better educate hunters about the dangers of lead ammunition and make it easier for them to switch to non-lead ammo.

Hundreds of people signed on with enthusiasm. Our plan is to present the letter to the NH Fish and Game Commission to start a dialog about what can be done to address this problem in New Hampshire.

Prizes!

Winners of our spinning wheel contest went home with a “Huggers” stuffed animal (eagle, fox, or black bear), and we also gave kid visitors a set of toy binoculars  to reinforce the idea that wildlife should be enjoyed, not destroyed.

Next year we will bring a lot more prizes, because the event was so well attended that we ran out of everything before noon!

Thank you to our volunteers and to everyone who stopped by to learn about the harm caused by lead ammunition.

This mother and baby loon enjoy some protection from lead poisoning, because in 2016 the sale and use of lead fishing tackle was banned in New Hampshire.

Speaking Out Against Bull Riding

As always, the New Hampshire Animal Rights League was on the ground at the SNHU Arena in Manchester to protest the Professional Bull Riders (PBR) Tour.

The League led two impactful demonstrations before each scheduled show — Saturday evening, Dec. 17, and Sunday afternoon, Dec. 18.

Thank you to everyone who came out — especially those who were there for both shows! — to speak up for bulls. 

Educating the public

While most ticketholders were not visibly receptive to the message that bull riding is animal abuse, demonstrators nonetheless succeeded in handing out more than 100 flyers (shown below).

The flyer content was inspired by the arguments we hear from those who think bull riding is harmless.

Going inside the arena

View from inside the SNHU Arena

Although supporting the PBR (or any business that uses animals for profit or entertainment) is discouraged, one NHARL board member did go inside to see first-hand what the bulls are subjected to. She writes:

It was pretty awful being inside the arena. I did see “eye white” and “diarrhea butt.” When the bull is in the chute and the rider is getting mounted, sometimes there was an overhead view on the big screen. The bulls are pretty calm, like they know the routine, but the crew will punch or pinch the bull to upset him so the rider can make sure he has a good grip before the gate opens.

The least experienced riders went first and were thrown off within 4 seconds. In most cases the bull would quickly look for the exit gate and leave the ring (he probably gets a reward out back). But sometimes the bull would keep bucking without the rider, because the flank strap was still tight, or he’d charge at the ring crew before leaving.

And a few times the now rider-less bull seemed like he didn't want to leave, and would charge at the crew and run around the ring. In this case a guy on a horse with a lasso would rope the bull and lead him to the exit.

The music was really loud, and they had the pyrotechnics, and there was this stupid clown guy telling jokes and shooting prizes into the stands. Overall, it was just a completely inappropriate setting for a peaceful herd animal.

I did not see any bull become visibly injured while I was there, but I left before the show ended.

What You Can Do

Vegan Candy and Conversation at the Howl-O-Ween 5K

On October 22, 2022, the New Hampshire Animal Rights League took part in the Animal Rescue League of NH’s annual Howl-O-Ween 5K with table featuring vegan Halloween candy and literature.

During this popular event, where costumed dogs and their people run a 3-mile race, we brought attention to less fortunate animals — those raised and killed for food.

Using Halloween candy as a starting point for talking about veganism, we explained why gelatin is gruesome and dairy is scary, while offering up a list of cruelty-free candy options.

vegan Dog Treats

For our canine visitors, we had two kinds of pumpkin treats — both very popular with the dogs who stopped by our table.

Why Do We Love One and Eat the Other?

Unfortunately, people who love dogs do not necessarily extend that care and concern to cows, pigs, and other animals considered food. To illustrate, among the dog lovers we met at the 5K event was a butcher, a turkey farmer, a pheasant hunter, and a woman who swears by her “paleo” diet.

While these folks haven’t yet recognized that all living beings should be spared unnecessary suffering, we also met quite a few vegans and vegetarians at the event.

Everyone went home with a bag of vegan candy and some vegan literature (shown below), in hopes of planting seeds.

Thank you to our volunteers and to everyone who stopped by our table.

Happy and cruelty-free Halloween!

Record turnout for Annual Summer Outing

After two missed summers due to the pandemic, the New Hampshire Animal Rights League’s summer outing returned on August 21, 2022 at Four Tree Island, Portsmouth with a record turnout!

It was a perfect day to be by the water, enjoying delicious vegan food, greeting old friends and making new ones, and learning about how we can protect the ocean and all sea life.

Vegan picnic fare was provided by Common Roots, a cafe, market, and yoga studio located in Rye, NH. President James Glover spent the day behind the grill (thank you, James!), serving up plant-based burgers and hot dogs. 

The Vegan Pirates proved to be indispensable, jumping in to work the food line, doling out sides of pasta salad, potato salad, vegan lobster rolls, and chips.

Dessert was a decadent platter of mouthwatering vegan brownies and chocolate chip cookies.

Special guest!

Just when it seemed things couldn’t be any more perfect, Ariel the Little Mermaid showed up! 

Ariel from Precious Parties by Kayla quickly had a line of children trailing her as she gave out hugs and shared tales of her underwater adventures.

During story time, Ariel read some books about compassion for animals, including sea animals, who are often overlooked. 

Speaking up for sea life

As the Little Mermaid can attest, fish are intelligent animals who feel pain just as we do. Because no U.S. law regulates the treatment of fish, both the commercial fishing industry and fish farms treat fish in ways that would be criminal if they were dogs or cats. 

Fishing is also bad for the environment. Bottom trawlers, commonly used in commercial fishing, drag nets larger than football fields along the ocean floor, scraping up everything in their path, including dolphins and sea turtles, and destroying entire underwater ecosystems in the process.

Posters were on display with information about the harm caused by fishing. (Scroll down to see the quiz questions and answers.)

Quiz

Lobster poster Q: In which three countries is it illegal to boil lobsters alive? A: Switzerland, Norway, and New Zealand

Fish poster Q: Every day the commercial fishing industry sets enough “longlines” to wrap around the entire earth how many times? A: 500

Shark poster Q: What is the best way to help sharks? A: Don’t eat fish. The commercial fishing industry kills more sharks than any other activity.

Turtle poster Q: What is the best way to keep plastic out of the ocean? A: Don’t eat fish. The commercial fishing industry is responsible for 46% of the plastic waste in the ocean.

Recipes

We also handed out delicious fish-free recipe cards. If you would like these recipe cards, just drop us an email at info@nhanimalrights.org and we’ll mail them to you!

Raffle

Lastly, we had a raffle, with the lucky winner taking home a treasure chest containing movie night snacks, 4 movie tickets to Chunky’s, and $20 toward vegan movie fare (yes, Chunky’s has the Beyond Burger!).

Thank you!

Thank you to everyone who came out for this bigger-than-ever summer outing, to all our helpers, and to those who made donations. We couldn’t do this work for animals without your support.

Speaking Up for Chickens at the Market Days Festival

Winner of the Ninja Air fryer

Thank you to everyone who entered to win the Ninja Air Fryer and accompanying plant-based air fryer cookbook. Our lucky winner was Jesse Cote!

New Hampshire Animal Rights League is pleased to share the news of our successful outreach efforts at the Market Days Festival in downtown Concord, NH. 

During this three-day event (June 23- 25), we spread the word about the work we do for animals and answered the question: What’s Wrong with Eating Eggs?

Visitors to our booth learned that there is a great deal of suffering and death involved  in the production of eggs. Whether raising caged or free-range chickens, it is standard practice in the egg industry to:

  • Obtain hens from hatcheries that kill all male chicks at birth. (All American hatcheries kill male chicks.)
  • Cut or burn off hens’ sensitive beaks to minimize how much they can damage themselves and others.
  • Crowd “free-range” hens so densely most never find their way outside.
  • Send hens to slaughter when their egg production decreases and the shells thin, around age 7-12 months.

Eye-Opening Video

We enticed approximately 200 people to watch the following 1-minute video from Farm Sanctuary founder Gene Baur answering the question, “What’s Wrong with Eggs?

Those who watched the video received a free can of vegan cold brew coffee from RISE Brewing Co. along with some conversation about what they had seen.

“Male” Chick Toys

We gave out “male” chick toys to draw people in so we could tell them what happens to the male chicks at the hatcheries that supply hens to egg farms as well as backyard chicken keepers.

 

On the tag, we wrote, “I lived only hours, because I was male — I had no worth, since I would never lay eggs.”

We included a QR code (with warning label) that opens a video of chicks being dumped into a macerator.

Goodie Bags

We handed out close to 200 “goodie” bags containing vegan literature (sampling below), vegan protein cookies from Munk Pack, and meatless jerky from Primal Spirit Foods.

Brochure

We showed visitors some of our favorite egg substitutes and handed out a brochure with more information.

The future is vegan

While much of the food at the festival was not vegan, encouragingly many vendors did offer a vegan option. Deadproof Pizza jokingly called theirs the “Obligatory Vegan Item.”

Free advertising space

On the backside of our tent, we displayed a heartbreaking illustration of speciesism drawn by friend of NHARL Holley Ackerson.

Thank you

Thank you to all our supporters and to everyone who stopped by to learn what’s wrong with eating eggs.

We hope to see you again next year!

Successful Outreach at NH SPCA PAWS Walk

New Hampshire Animal Rights League was on site at the NH SPCA’s annual PAWS Walk Fundraiser to answer the question: “What’s Wrong with Eating Eggs?”

Chickens make wonderful companions, and we encourage adopting birds from an animal shelter, such as the NH SPCA. But there are a number of problems with keeping chickens for the purpose of eating their eggs.

We explained to visitors that there is a great deal of suffering and death involved in producing eggs — even those from “free-range” farms, which are increasingly becoming the target of law suits for deceptive marketing.

Whether raising caged or free-range chickens, it is standard practice in the egg industry to:
  • Obtain hens from hatcheries that kill all male chicks at birth. (All American hatcheries kill male chicks.)
  • Cut or burn off hens’ sensitive beaks to minimize how much they can damage themselves and others.
  • Crowd “free-range” hens so densely most never find their way outside.
  • Send hens to slaughter when their egg production decreases and the shells thin, around age 7-12 months.
We showed visitors some of our favorite egg substitutes, gave away samples of Black Salt (Kala Namak), which can be used to add an “eggy” flavor to dishes, and handed out a brochure with more information, along with vegan starter kits.

Overall, it was a very productive day for NHARL, with lots of meaningful conversations and a bunch of new names for our mailing list.

Letter: Using pandemic federal money for hatcheries is a misuse of funds

Letter to the Editor
The Conway Daily Sun
May 13, 2022 

Using pandemic federal money for hatcheries is a misuse of funds

New Hampshire Fish and Game has a fish hatchery problem. It is being sued by the Conservation Law Foundation, an environmental advocacy organization, for polluting the Merrymeeting River with wastewater from its Powder Mill Fish Hatchery. According to Fish and Game, they cannot keep pollutant levels within EPA limits because the hatcheries, where staff raise millions of fish each year for “put and take” fishing, are old and in disrepair.

Despite taking in millions in fishing license revenue, which is matched by millions from the federal Sport Fishing Restoration Act of 1950, Fish and Game has somehow not managed to maintain and upgrade the hatcheries appropriately.

Recently, Fish and Game saw an opportunity to receive money for its polluting hatcheries in N.H.’s share of the federal American Rescue Plan Act funds. First, the department asked for and received $1 million in federal funds for a study to rebuild Powder Mill Hatchery. Then last month, they were back, asking for and receiving $55 million more to rebuild two other of the six state hatcheries.

Those in power think the unnatural process of farm-raised fishing is so important to New Hampshire that it warrants spending a huge chunk of pandemic recovery funding on it.

We each have an executive councilor who represents us and approved this expenditure. Express your outrage that N.H. fish hatcheries are getting money that should be used for pandemic relief. The hatcheries should be downsized or closed if license sales can’t pay for them.

LINDA DIONNE
Raymond

Successful Day at NH Fish & Game Event

New Hampshire Animal Rights League is delighted to share the news of our successful outreach efforts at NH Fish & Game’s Discover Wild NH Day held April 16 in Concord.

During this popular family event that attracts thousands, we spread a message of kindness toward mice and other “uninvited houseguests.”

Despite being stationed in a back corner, our tent attracted non-stop visitors, with people waiting in long lines to spin our “Save the Mouse” wheel. 

Accomplishments

  • Educated hundreds of people, young and old, about the cruelty of using glue traps and poison bait blocks.
  • Sounded the alarm about the dangers rodent poisons pose to owls, foxes, bobcats, and other predators, who can become sick and die from consuming poisoned mice.
  • Connected with fellow exhibitor NH Falconers in our shared desire to protect raptors from rodenticide poisoning. Wildlife rehabilitators have seen a dramatic increase in sick owls and other predators
  • Donated books that encourage living in harmony with wildlife — The Humane Gardener and Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation That Starts in Your Yard — for the event-wide raffle.

Literature

We handed out copies of Are You Poisoning Pets and Wildlife? and our own brochure created for this event, Living with Our Wild Neighbors.

Eye-Catching Poster

We displayed the following eye-catching poster from Raptors Are the Solution (RATS) and discussed it with visitors to our booth.

Smart Mouse Trap Giveaway

We gave out more than 50 safe and humane Smart Mouse Traps and provided hands-on, personal instruction.

Postcard Campaign

We invited children and adults to sign or write postcards asking Walmart to stop selling glue traps and JP Pest Services to offer a more responsible approach to rodent control than indiscriminately littering the landscape with deadly poison.

Hundreds of postcards will be in the mail to Walmart and JP Pest Services. Photos of a few favorites are included below.

Mouse Toy Prizes

As a reward for sending a postcard, kids got to choose from an assortment of adorable catnip mouse toys. The mice were a huge hit, even in households without a cat!

Thank you to our volunteers and to everyone who stopped by to learn about the many reasons to be nice to mice.

After all, it’s their world, too.

Letter: Stop animal research

Letter in the Concord Monitor
February 23, 2022

Letter: Stop animal research

A month ago, a truck transporting a hundred macaque monkeys from NY to a quarantine facility in Florida was involved in a traffic accident. The monkeys, packed in wooden boxes, were thrown from the truck. Three escaped. Once found, the three were shot and killed by the police. How the other monkeys fared in the accident was not reported. The monkeys are from the island nation of Mauritius. They were going to a quarantine facility to pre-check for any diseases or viruses they might be carrying before being used for research. The officials who purchased the macaques have not released information about the monkeys that survived the accident. A passerby stopped at the accident out of concern. She looked in one of the boxes, later became ill, and was awaiting test results for monkey-borne diseases.

Have we learned nothing from COVID-19 and other animal-borne diseases that have jumped to humans, such as we also witnessed with Ebola? There are alternatives to using animals in research that are much safer and would cost the taxpayer less money. Imagine how much money it costs to purchase a hundred monkeys, fly them to the U.S. and then house and quarantine them for several months before possibly using them for research. It’s time to stop exploiting, confining, and in most cases torturing animals for research. We need to transition to only non-animal research. If we leave the animals alone, they will leave us alone.

LINDA DIONNE
Raymond